"If you haven't forgiven yourself something, how can you forgive others?"
– Dolores Huerta

About Dolores Huerta
American labor leader Dolores Huerta cofounded the United Farm Workers and played a major role in the American civil-rights movement. She was born in a mining town in New Mexico in 1930 and raised in California's Central Valley, where she saw the plight of farmworkers up close. She abandoned teaching for activism after witnessing her students' poverty. Her best-known campaign was the successful grape boycott of the 1960's. She currently serves as president of the Dolores Huerta Foundation, an organization aimed at promoting social justice in agricultural regions of California.
"When the heart speaks, the mind finds it indecent to object."
– Milan Kundera

About Milan Kundera
Milan Kundera, the modernist Czech novelist best known for The Unbearable Lightness of Being, laces politics and philosophical digressions into his complex narrative structure. He was born in 1929 on April Fool's Day, and his first novel was, appropriately enough, The Joke. An ardent reformist, he was ejected from the Communist party twice for speaking out against repression. In 1975, he fled to France, where he still teaches.
"When you encounter difficulties and contradictions, do not try to break them, but bend them with gentleness and time."
– St. Francis de Sales

About St. Francis de Sales
St. Francis de Sales (1567–1622), known as the Gentle Saint, was bishop of Geneva. His motto was, "He who preaches with love preaches effectively," and his religious texts, including Introduction to the Devout Life, have resonated with many non-Catholics. Pope Pius IX proclaimed him a patron saint of writers. Some consider him a patron saint of the deaf; he invented a form of sign language to teach a young deaf man how to communicate.
"When you encounter difficulties and contradictions, do not try to break them, but bend them with gentleness and time."
– St. Francis de Sales


About St. Francis de Sales

St. Francis de Sales (1567–1622), known as the Gentle Saint, was bishop of Geneva. His motto was, "He who preaches with love preaches effectively," and his religious texts, including Introduction to the Devout Life, have resonated with many non-Catholics. Pope Pius IX proclaimed him a patron saint of writers. Some consider him a patron saint of the deaf; he invented a form of sign language to teach a young deaf man how to communicate.
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
– Theodore Seuss Giesel


About Theodore Seuss Giesel

Theodor Seuss Geisel, the beloved Dr. Seuss, is renowned to generations of children as the author of Green Eggs and Ham and other deliciously absurd picture books. He was born in 1904 in Springfield, Massachusetts. His first book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, was rejected 27 times. He wrote The Cat in the Hat after Houghton Mifflin asked him to write a children's primer using fewer than 250 easy-reader words. He died in 1991.
Love is an act of endless forgiveness, a tender look which becomes a habit."
– Peter Ustinov

About Peter Ustinov
British actor Peter Ustinov is best known for his Oscar-winning roles in Topkapi and Spartacus. He was born in London in 1921 to parents of blended pan-European extraction. He wrote several plays as well as a well-received autobiography, Dear Me. From 1969 until his death in 2004, he took on the role of goodwill ambassador for UNICEF, visiting disadvantaged children all over the world. He said his multicultural background gave him automatic loyalty to the UN.
"Dreams come true. Without that possibility, nature would not incite us to have them."
– John Updike

About John Updike
John Updike, the Pulitzer Prize–winning American novelist known for his careful craftsmanship and small-town settings, published more than 60 books before his death in 2009. Born in Pennsylvania in 1932, he suffered from stammering as a child and was encouraged by his mother to write. After college, he joined The New Yorker as a regular contributor. He is best known for his series of novels about a fictional alter ego, including Rabbit, Run and Rabbit at Rest.
"The thing always happens that you really believe in; and the belief in a thing makes it happen."
– Frank Lloyd Wright

About Frank Lloyd Wright
The influential American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, father of the Prairie Style, is most famous for designing the Guggenheim Museum. He was born in Wisconsin in 1867. His buildings have strong geometric lines and often mimic their environment. He believed that form and function should be one, and that the way people live in a space shapes the space itself. His personal life was tumultuous; he married three times and lost his beloved mistress to a fire at his home. He died in 1959.
"We strain to renew our capacity for wonder, to shock ourselves into astonishment once again."
– Shana Alexander

About Shana Alexander
Shana Alexander, the pioneering American journalist who was the first female staff writer at Life magazine, was best known for her combative "Point-Counterpoint" segments with conservative James Kilpatrick on 60 Minutes, which became fodder for a long-running Saturday Night Live spoof. She was born in 1925 in New York City. Her first assignment as a journalist was to interview the stripper Gypsy Rose Lee. She wrote several nonfiction books, mostly true crime accounts. She died in 2005.
"It is a mistake to try to look too far ahead. The chain of destiny can only be grasped one link at a time."
– Winston Churchill

About Winston Churchill
Sir Winston Churchill was an extraordinary British prime minister; he laid the groundwork for welfare in England, helped set the boundaries in the Middle East, became a symbol of the resistance against the Nazis in Europe, and was a central force in the Allied victory in World War II. He was born in 1874 near Oxford. He was known for his courage, his stubbornness, and his powerful personality. He was also an accomplished painter and writer. He died in 1965.
"Behold the turtle. He makes progress only when he sticks his neck out."
– James Bryant Conant

About James Bryant Conant
James Bryant Conant, the American chemist and educator, is known both for his role in the Manhattan Project — which developed the first nuclear weapons — and for his innovative tenure as president of Harvard University. Harvard had been a finishing school for the rich; Conant turned it into a world-class research university and created aptitude tests to choose students by ability. These tests became the basis for the SAT. He was born in Massachusetts in 1893 and died in New Hampshire in 1978.
"To accomplish great things, we must not only act, but also dream; not only plan, but also believe."
– Anatole France

About Anatole France
Anatole France was the pen name of Nobel Prize–winning French author Jacques Anatole François Thibault. He was born in 1844 in Paris. His father was a book dealer, and France spent his life among books, including 14 years as assistant librarian to the French Senate. His novels, including the Contemporary History series and The Gods Are Athirst, often use allegory and religious symbolism as vehicles for moral questions. He died in 1924.
"Man's main task in life is to give birth to himself, to become what he potentially is."
– Erich Fromm

About Erich Fromm
Erich Fromm, the humanist German psychoanalyst and author, is best known for his book, The Art of Loving, which describes love as care, responsibility, respect, and knowledge. Born in Germany in 1900, he emigrated to the United States in 1934, fleeing Hitler's regime. He taught at a number of universities in the U.S. and Mexico and wrote eight books delineating his view of human nature. He believed that modern society makes us feel isolated and long to reach out to others. He died in 1980.
"The best antidote I have found is to yearn for something. As long as you yearn, you can't congeal: There is a forward motion to yearning."
– Gail Godwin

About Gail Godwin
American author Gail Godwin is best known for her well-developed characters in such novels as A Mother and Two Daughters, The Odd Woman, and Violet Clay, all National Book Award nominees. She was born in 1937 in Alabama and raised in North Carolina. She married and divorced twice and lived with composer Robert Starer for 25 years until his death in 2001. They collaborated on ten musical works. She has written 13 novels and two short-story collections. She lives in Woodstock, New York.
"Never regret. If it's good, it's wonderful. If it's bad, it's experience."
– Victoria Holt

About Victoria Holt
Victoria Holt was one of prolific British author Eleanor Hibbert's many pen names. She was born Eleanor Burford in London in 1906. She took odd jobs until she met and married George Hibbert; after that, she had time to write. And write she did, producing over 200 novels. As Victoria Holt she wrote gothic romances, as Jean Plaidy she wrote historical novels about royalty, and as Philippa Carr she wrote family sagas. She also used four other pseudonyms. She died in 1993.